USA College: A Debt Mousetrap

Several days ago I came to a profound conclusion while having a conversation with my friends about the manifold issues facing humanity.  I can only paraphrase, but what I spoke would have been something like this: “It’s like this man- these times, you can speak to anyone of any race, sex, age, any IQ at any point on any spectrum.  And if you investigate and evaluate the continuity of their analytical judgement, you will find that every person identifies with one or more of these issues facing society.  And if you were to spend years organizing these people and their critical opinions into some type of conceptual map which symbolizes these issues on our minds, what you would have is some type of symbolic onion.  Every problem appears somewhere on this skins of this onion.  The large, outer layers represent the most popular issues which society often becomes embroiled within, such as guns or abortion; because these arguments easily provide moral high ground or lip service.  However, these arguments tend to be impossible because they form around the deeper layers of this abstruse onion of problems, and no progress can take place until we surmount the ULTIMATE ISSUE in the center, which threatens the integrity of the entire onion.”

A good example was a program I watched on CNN “Ana Kasparian and Scotty Nell Hughes debate whether media is out of touch.”  The question was essentially asking if many members of the establishment media are deaf to the frustration of the middle class because journalists from these major media outlets tend to be funded by corporations who enforce censorship in the interests of preserving the system of income inequality.  Scotty Nell, a CNN television anchor said: “You make some very good points but honestly I do not buy into that argument because in journalism we know that were not just talking about “the physical”.  When we’re 19 trillion dollars in debt, we have 94 million people out of the work force, we see terrorism not only abroad but right here at home.  those are the stories that are leading our headlines so a journalist has to have their head completely in the sand if they don’t realize that is what people are watching and the ratings show that those type of headlines make it.”

Ana Kasparian replied: “I just wanted to make a statement about how a lot of the issues that matter most to the electorate don’t get covered.  Let me give you an example of it.  Student loan debt is one of them that is impacting our economy in one of the most negative ways imaginable and we’re sitting here having discussions about immigration and building walls right now.  You’d rather fear monger about a non-existent threat inside the United States as opposed to focusing on something that is burdening the Millennial generation in our economy.  How are Millennials supposed to contribute to our economy when they’re burdened with student loan debt, when we’re dealing with a system that is corrupt?  62 of the richest people in the world individually own more wealth than the bottom 3.5 billion people in the world and I do think it’s worth it to address this in journalism.”

I can only make claims about the United States, because it is the only country I am really familiar with the personality of this nation, and I know the way power flows here.  This is why many income inequality alarmists fail to pinpoint practical, non partisan implications of today’s level of income inequality.  It’s near impossible to pinpoint any type of accurate statement about a human being!  The poorest man I know likes like a raccoon, yet his mind is brilliant as a Renaissance engineer.  Some day when I convince him to go to college, I will post his story here.mousetrap

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